May 30, 2021

Antique Bottle Collecting - I'm Digging Your Dump!


Transcript
intro:

You're listening to a mid life less ordinary, the weekly podcast giving you the lowdown on becoming a cool older dude. The good times are not afraid of memory. It's time to start loving them again. And here are your hosts, Wayne and Trev.

Wayne:

Hello, and welcome to a mid life less ordinary, and this episode is entitled antique bottle collecting. I'm digging your dump. My name is Wayne and trebs. Here also 10 green bottles hiding in your dump. No, no, no, no, no. Trev we've given up on the musical intro. We've gone back to our old intro. Well, what do you mean, I don't get it. Well, we did do we did do that on one episode. And I know we were talking. Yeah, I've

Trev:

rehearsed that all week. money on a vocal train for that.

Wayne:

Do you want to do like a wind to shine guy? Oh my god. Yes. Yeah, I'm not even going to where this conversation is going this early in the episode, but maybe the toiler Yeah, I knew that was going there. Next we're gonna hear about cottages and things. I just can't even go there. Right, thanks. Sorry, Trev that you put in all that practice. But we'll give you an episode where you can sing a million uses of exactly. This episode, as we say is all about antique bottle collecting. We have an expert Paul Cunningham, who's going to tell us all about the hobby. And you'll find out why we've referenced the subtitle. I'm digging your dump. In during the during the interview, I'm sure Trev What do you know about bottle collecting? Nothing. I'm not a thief. Thanks for now to go back to sleep. But if you never saw when he was a kid used to go over the fields and sort of accidentally come across things.

Trev:

The closest I've ever got was collecting milk balls with adverts or when I was a kid. Oh, okay. So I think my brother still got the so I don't know if there weren't very many. If anybody phones you can get contact us on there and say like, yeah, there was I mean, I don't know. Well, they used to have adverts on cornflakes and stuff. Oh, yeah. What? Do you remember that

Wayne:

vintage? No, I don't actually know.

Trev:

All right. Yeah, they did. Yeah, they did. You look them up. You can look them up. They are Yeah. But this is obviously these a little bit more antique and a little bit more special with a monomial boil. Yeah.

Wayne:

say I've accidentally come across some of these bottles when I've been when I was a kid. I just used to go. I mean, these places have been built over in there. But when we used to go Yeah. Used to be lots of football grounds. I think I remember going over the back where you did when he was a kid just just climbing trees and you had no toys had no home? I had no to it. Yeah, I was like sticker dump. Yeah, I'll just yeah, either. So finding glass was my own wine and play with the mud. And play with the mark is that so you're gonna get plenty of people would agree with me that that was better times and really locked away now, I'm sure. But yeah, I remember finding some sort of antique second world war but was at the time I remember reference. And obviously we didn't have the internet in these days. So hopefully, Paul can teach us a bit about what it's all about what what's good about it and frustrating. If there's any sort of Holy Grail at all of the battle. I'm looking

Trev:

forward to providing something about this because he's, I don't know anything about it at all. We got a lot of bold being on here. I'll tell you that.

Wayne:

So without any further ado, let's go over to Paul, and welcome to the show. So thank you for joining us today, Paul. It's really nice to have you on and bottle collecting. I believe it's called is that is it read actual other kind of scientific name for it? Oh,

Paul:

well, thanks for inviting me first of all. Yeah, I mean, it's bottle collecting really. which involves eager them up. So I suppose it gets called bottle digging bottle collecting. I mean, I do collect bottles that I don't dig. You know, you can buy bottles on eBay on an auction sites and you swap with other collectors as well. But the real fun of me is digging them up.

Wayne:

Did you add your juice? How did you start makes a nickel? I mean, where do you add somebody give you a bottle? Did you find one or did you buy just fell

Unknown:

down a hole? Well, I think it goes back a long way. I mean

Paul:

it in a sort of late 70s, early 80s. It was a bit of a craze. That was quite a big hobby. And I can't remember how, how I really got involved. I think I might have seen i think i think i had a friend's brother who was a collector and I just got interested in them. So I did I first started bald again when I was probably 1516 perhaps younger 1415 and didn't really carry on for that. Long and probably probably stopped in the early 80s. And it's because of the lockdown and having no work, rekindled my interest in it and I started going out exploring again. So for the last year, we've been actively digging again, which has been great.

Trev:

We've actually got a mid lifeless ordering first here, Paul. I've actually done a bit of research. Wow. I've actually done a little bit of research, because I couldn't trust trust wine to do it. Ah, none of this stuff wine comes out with online and that's not really relevant to be honest. I've read the way they turned me as dumped digging. Is that a term that's used?

Paul:

Well, it is but is really a term that Americans use is awful digging bolt off and collecting is well wide. mainly in the colonial countries. In Australia, yeah. America, of course. and South Africa. So it's a kind of an American ism. Whereas, like a war soccer, you know,

Trev:

I can't understand. Yeah, so there's there's nothing over here. Yeah, cuz really, if you call it a dump, dig in. It's not got any reference to boulders it?

Paul:

No, you're just digging.

Wayne:

I'd say whines a dump digger. I was gonna be nice today.

Trev:

Yeah, that you wouldn't you wouldn't think that there's not no reference to bald at all, is there so you wouldn't know what a bald collector is from that term dump digging? He really wouldn't

Paul:

know not necessarily know. I mean, I mean, dumps are full of interesting things apart from bottles to kind of study of social history really, of this age, that you're digging, you know, the bottles of water, the the dumpster, you're digging, you're discovering about people's lives from what they used. I mean, it's not uncommon. You dig up lots of things apart from bottoms, like old shoes, and children's toys, play pipes, all sorts of stuff that Victorians and their audience would use in their daily lives, just anything really, like they would have thrown in their bin just like we do today. You know, if you look in your bin in the kitchen, you chuck everything in there. Don't worry so much. Well, but yeah, so anything that went in the bin ended up in the dump,

Wayne:

so that there was obviously no recycling in Victorian times, I'm guessing No, there were all kinds of handmade as well, Paul, when they so he's got a work going into these bottles, and his people just fry them into the local tip kind of thing.

Paul:

Well, yeah, I mean, bottles were a very expensive thing for the Brewers and the manufacturers to purchase probably the most expensive thing. So most of them were had returns on them, which is strange, because they ended up in the dump. But people obviously couldn't be bothered to get there. You know, a call to de return is used. I don't know if you remember but years back, we used to go around to the park and collect our wine bottles because yeah, two and a half cents or something and go into the sweet shop. But they still ended up in the dump. But yeah, they were very expensive part. So they were the idea from a brewer would be you know, to have the bottles reused many times.

Trev:

Yeah, and they'd love that. Yeah, when I was looking at the pictures in there, all of them have really sort of colourful and like different shapes is that what a lot of collectors go for? His Blue Jays browns, and what he did the colours really signify anything that was not a lemon, he drink blue and the mind thinking a bit too advanced for them. I don't know.

Paul:

No, no, no, you're not I mean, poison bottles were always either green or blue. And so that would be you know, wherever identify them. And they also put ribs on them. So if anyone has had poor eyesight or as many Victorian homes or you know, the lighting was poor, so no one got up in the middle of the night and had a swig of a rat poison bottle because

Wayne:

Am I being stupid in saying ribs on it? Did they have been silly in saying that they might have had a skull and crossbones cut into the most

Trev:

basic Yes, I've seen that in Paul's obviously a really intelligent man and you just say not hold on. Don't touch that because he's got they're not pirates. why they're not pirates, are they? Let's be honest

Paul:

with him. Why he's obviously been doing his research. Just waiting for that. You know, if you if you're lucky enough to find a skull and crossbones on it, it's, you know, will be what we call a mentor, you know, really assets. buffet will be worth a lot of money. Wow.

Wayne:

That's what I was going to say at Chipotle. I mean, out of all these bottles and the lovely colours they come with obviously, for decorative purposes. Is there any that are like the holy grail of such like, not like raise the last dog before Trevor jumps in again. But were there any that are sort of super collectible maybe worth more than others or some people were looking for and we'll dig up like 10 dumps to find choose wisely. Yeah.

Paul:

Well, yeah, absolutely. Yeah. I mean, bottles their value or range from 50 patents up to staggering amounts of money. I mean, I was recently very privileged to sounds rather sad doesn't I was very privileged recently to actually see someone's bottle that was actually what is what we call a blue cobalt blue cod bottle. Which is really is the holy grail and was worth in excess of 10,000 pounds. Wow. Well, yeah. Very rare people. Yeah, there's value. Yeah. Yes. I mean, they didn't. They didn't make money because cobalt glass was expensive to manufacture. So yeah, that rare in essence. Yeah.

Wayne:

And Trev decided to do action figures there. Yeah. I've not got a blue cup. But I've got to go. That'd be a very lucky man. You wouldn't be on this show. Paul.

Trev:

You wouldn't be on this show. You'd be like highbrow in it on what's that dude's name? This got the top podcast in why Joe Rogan's grown up to be seen on the Joe Rogan show. My

Wayne:

name is Paul, you've got a lot coming on this problem. There we go. I've done that one this morning.

Trev:

Does any of these come from sort of metal detecting? Cuz easy? Is it worth using a metal detector? Can you find? Well, it's always gone. Oh, no, you're the expert. I'm just

Paul:

I mean, a lot of people who collect bottles also do metal detecting because I suppose it's kind of treasure hunting in existence. But you could use I mean, I have heard of people using metal detectors just to find the metal in the ground, which is normally associated with with rubbish dumps is normally the metal objects in there too. Because of course, the metal detector wouldn't pick up any of the cloud. It might it might give you an indication of where you might want to start looking, you know? Oh, well, I

Trev:

guess that does make a bit more sense. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. Cuz I thought we were sorry. Yeah. Why would you didn't metal detector to look for glass but if you're looking at obviously Yeah, that does make a lot more sense. Apple really does.

Paul:

I think it's an it's something I've never done but I know a lot of people who do collect bottles also, you know, Joy

Wayne:

is it this is their I, my son Trevor said we do a basic amount of research on this programme only because obviously we could do a lot more poll but to be honest, I didn't do a basic research I did quite decent. Yeah, that's what he knew about exposure for you keep going on. So good research. Yeah. Thank you, Paul. Yeah, you're not coming on again. Even when you get that blue, cobalt white, he's gonna see that I've heard that. That's my small amount of research bald, there's a pond till mark on the bottom of a bottle that you can take a lot from

Paul:

you can I mean not? upon Phil mark is like you've probably seen the pictures of man blowing a bottle on us on a stick was a palm tool rod. And when they finished blowing it, they snap it off. So on the base of the bottle, you'd see it's like a swirly whirly where it snapped the glass off when it was still molten. So palm to bottles are very old. I mean, they probably didn't really make many after the sort of 1850s or 60s if I'm correct. So that is normally a sign of a much older bottle because got upon to mark on on the on the bars. You've sort

Wayne:

of hit a jackpot if you like if you find one with

Paul:

that one. Yeah, yeah, I mean that you do find them. My family recently. A wine bottle with a pontoon mark on it which makes them interesting because it's just to think that you're stuck with the into someone's rod.

Trev:

Wine quite used to blow in a lot of reuteri go around, don't take these places. docks and stuff and blows a lot of rods. I didn't think there was a lot of glass manufacturing near docks To be honest, but you can only get a word where you can find it. disciple. What's your prized possession? In your playing? How many bowls? have you got? Roughly?

Paul:

You know, I couldn't really answer that question. I wouldn't, I wouldn't know I would have been I'm standing, looking at some of my collection now. And I've got hundreds, probably 1000s

Trev:

of pitches to us, which I've looked at and you do have a lot of balls.

Wayne:

I'll ever see such a good job poll today again, as well.

Paul:

Now, I couldn't really answer that, because there's so many but I, you know, I try, I try to refrain from adding them all on show because it'd be rather ridiculous. So you kind of pick yes ones? Yeah. Which is your best one. Paul, would you say? Well, that's a hard question. Probably one of my code bottles, older thought,

Trev:

yeah. More difficult to find. And the rest of them are just stumbled across it.

Paul:

Well, they are difficult to find they were one of the most mass produced bottles because they normally had mineral water or soda pop in them, and sometimes ginger beer, but they're the ones that you might have seen around where they have a marble in the neck. Which, you know, which is quite a novelty. And the reason they had the marble in them is because they use that to to keep the gas inside the bottle because it didn't have the means of of keeping gaseous liquid in the bottle.

Wayne:

Oh, yeah. Yeah, it's like saying so that carbonation did then pour as well. Sorry, I know they're so slightly different

Paul:

carbonated? Yeah. Originally, they used to have them in coke bottles. But what would happen is that the court would dry out and the court with pop. So the Victorians had to design their method of sealing carbonated water drinks without all these problems involved and a man called Herman cod came up with the Henson I don't know

Wayne:

a guy of officiate Australia His name is another high value item I believe that from what I read somewhere Paul was under no chair is going to come out with saying and silly with this but I promise you I won't know I Okay, thanks for that. Obviously what it was about is that I've read that Vaseline glass is quite well respected.

Paul:

Vaseline glass Well, I think you've got me there I've got Vaseline glass bottles, but you've probably done more research only one can you now Yeah,

Wayne:

this is where Trevor probably can't hold back and says Wayne's always looking for if you've mentioned the word VAT is very hard. And dogs fighting hard but no sorry. Yeah, so I had to remember this because of my research doesn't lend itself to pens so I had to try and remember what I remember reading what I've already stated it was the high value items of what you've already stated to be honest and fair remember that cobalt blue a Vaseline jars all sorts of a and yellow green bottles I believe so it's the colours like you said I guess it's the the work that goes into them

Paul:

well i think so I mean the colour The reason the bottoms all different shapes and different colours was early form of advertising. So if you walked into a coffee shop and branding Yeah, so you know, you'd have a bottle with you get called bottoms example with different coloured lips. So the top of it would be blue or red. So we started out on the shelf. And the other reason they did do that was because bottles had such high value. When the when the bottles have been reused, it used to go to what they call bottle banks, bottle exchanges, because bottles used to get stolen and sold by hawkers on to other manufacturers. So by putting by putting a red lip on it, you could identify it as being your bottle. And it couldn't be used by someone else making you theory of products and put, you know, trying to further slugging it. So So yeah, that's what makes them rare, I think because there's certain colour called bottom lips, the blues and browns were were only supplied to one or two local manufacturers in one area otherwise everyone wouldn't know whose was whose so if you had if you had a red red top in London, it would only be a law wise bottle or Beatty bottle so they could identify their bottles and other people couldn't sell them because it was called a big market. So via if two people sell them on the back market if you like,

Trev:

any of our listeners, if any of our listeners, because would want to take this up as a hobby, because that's what we're trying to kind of see people, you know, encourage but do you have to get permission on on blog sites on someone's land? Or have you ever been caught on something somewhere you shouldn't be?

Paul:

Well, Pilates folk lectures will kind of sort of look the other way when you say that because there isn't a bit of land in this country that doesn't belong to someone. So no. I mean, the protocol really is to gain permission, but a lot of lot of times that doesn't happen in case you get a refusal.

Trev:

Yeah, can you imagine? Yeah, because you think, Oh, that must be really good there. But if I ask they got now sorry, fella. And two people pay to go on these sites. What the farmer got to think?

Paul:

Well, I think it goes on. Yeah, I mean, yeah. There's been 1000s of pounds exchanged. I know that for a fact, it was some land owners who've got a really good Victorian Edwardian dump on their land, people have discovered it for one way or another, and offered the farmer good money or the landowner good money to dig it exclusively. And in fact, back in the 80s, when the hobby was quite, quite big. People that land owners discovered they had a Victorian dump on their land, make good money out of it, because it bit like going to efficient light for the day you pay your 10 pounds and go fishing, you've got a kind of day ticket onto the land, and you could dig a hole, and then go away and take what you found with you. So some people did make quite a lot of money out of it. In the old days. It doesn't really exist so much now,

Wayne:

talking of lots of money, changing hands, but I'm going to give you the chance to take part in saying where money can't buy you in now. And it's our weekly quiz, which used to be called test drive, as you might have heard, we now do a test against all right. Well, we don't worry, it's not a site. I mean, trying to do research for this actual subject, I found really difficult to be honest. So after literally just do a bit of read, and as you know, I haven't got a pen. So I had to do a bit of reading and kind of make some questions up and we've covered some of it, I think so it's just a bit of fun. It's mostly so I can somehow get some revenge on trail

Unknown:

is basically used to make me look as stupid as he can.

Wayne:

Yeah. And that's why he gets to me before and so good your research. So we've got a bit of a bit of an intro into it, Paul for don't mind anyway, go.

Trev:

Test, test, test, test case. People call it something different than special. But we'll

Wayne:

go to first question to you. Boy, it's only four questions in toto. After which decade where bottles manufactured mostly by a machine? And I'll give you the four possible answers. Was it 1890s 1910s 1920s or 1950s 1950s? Well, to do the first one wrong. Yeah, these are these is actually the 1920s and I haven't got any elaboration on our answer of why that was 1820s. I sometimes do that research. But I call that wrong. You know, that is right. Question, the integrity of tests. The case is Yeah, as I say these aren't, these aren't easy, because the dates, it's easy to get, you're going to get things that cross over. But that is that is in fact, you know, when most manufacturing is efficient. You can you can come back to me and I'll add it to suit or they did the podcast well over a period but say that one on the chin. So I'm going to I'm going to give Trev the the one that would make him look the most silliest so. Which of the No, no, I'm going to go this one. stoneware bottles were used mainly for what beverage during late Victorian and Edwardian times. Was it mead? Was it wine? Was it ginger beer, or was it Diet Coke?

Trev:

Well, I can't imagine that there was a great deal of guys walking around with their tops off drinking Diet Coke and moving right into office windows looking at oh my god look at him. So that one's got to change a bit. Ah

Paul:

that's why it's called stone ginger beer because it came in a stone bottle.

Wayne:

collaboration. Thanks, Paul. Yeah, I didn't know that. You're trying to do that.

Unknown:

I'm sure yeah.

Wayne:

I was convinced it make himself look an alpha. I won't do the other date when I'll give Paul the other one. That's that's actually a question. Which of these items still come under the general umbrella of bottle collecting? Is it one? China dolls heads? Is it two Silver Goblets free antique LED lights? For Roman cups? is Shawn adulterers. Can you explain that, Paul? Do you ever come across these things?

Paul:

Well, I have I have a few up here the Victorian dollies. Because the Victorians would have they would for children to play with. I'd have a china head and China hands on China legs and a cotton body. And they got and they got thrown away. And yeah.

Trev:

It's a bit freaky if you can think of is the end. Kind of the Apes. Yeah. That's creepy as hell. Yeah. Did you drop it? What do you pick job? Oh.

Wayne:

to expect that on a deep train for friends avoid actually revolving eyes. So that's Whoa. Oh, that wouldn't be good. That guy strike back in the very chalky. Yeah. Oh, it's more like that ventriloquist thing with Anthony Hopkins as well imagines with magic. Yeah, sorry. Sorry. Sorry. We're going off again. So yeah, right. Back to the test guest. Dr. Last question to you. In which decade did bottle collecting become popular in the UK? So is it the 19? I think Paul actually said this. exam. Yeah, this is Yeah, pulls out to somewhere. Here's another one. I can't I haven't done night loads. I've only got four of us are on furlough, you know. So is it the 1950s 1960s 1970s or 1980s?

Trev:

Well, as I've had help from Paul on this, cuz he mentioned it earlier, I believe, says 1980s.

Wayne:

He's I don't know. I thought he said the 70s. But it is in fact the 70s. I think he did it. Yeah. I wish I'd given you that one first poll now. And then obviously, we could attack the whitewash drive, but it is what it is. Thank you for that. Good. elaborations. Of course, I say they were really difficult to sort of fight anything on. I hate to congratulate wine. But again, that's not gonna last very long. Let's just be sensible here. Yeah, so we good research. Thank you very much. So yeah, quite a lot. This man is my attorney. For trade touched on is there like, I dare say, you guys, I think you've mentioned it just before the show. You don't you guys don't like to give away like the secret digging places, obviously. But if somebody one is interested in starting isn't, obviously if you look at these bottles, they're great. You know, they're really pretty if you like nice things in your house even and just fancy having to go. This is you know, a lot of people like the outdoor life and that's what it is. Where would they go? Where would you recommend to start?

Paul:

Well, that's a really difficult question to answer because dumps are so hard to find. Nowadays, because most of them have been built on as towns and cities are expanded. I mean, there's Victorians used to dump their rubbish out of town and course out of town is now they're out there in the outskirts, or the inner city in many cases. So most of its been built on. I mean, there's no way where you can actually go digging that I would know of now, you have to do endless research to find find your own dump really, which is part of the fun of it as well is very rewarding. If you actually do your own research,

Wayne:

would you say join a club or something poorly, and then obviously, that they can help you out with all the resources

Paul:

but I don't think there's so many clubs around now there was back in the 70s and 80s. They used to be the British bottle diggers club. I think it was called. But I think they've long since sort of disappeared. So it's kind of hard. It's quite a hard thing to get into or really from scratch, like golf or or angling where you could go and pay to have a go So I suppose first thing, I mean, you can buy lots of bottles on eBay, which is quite, quite good. But you again, you need to know what you're looking for. But to actually start digging, unfortunately, I think it's quite tricky one to answer.

Trev:

Yeah, it is not a kind of book, like you can buy where it seems like these are locations or is it? So secret? No.

Paul:

No that I mean, there's lots of books written on bottle collecting, and they give you idea, give you an idea of where to look and how to find dumps where they might be in towns and cities and in the countryside, of course. So there's a lot of books available on the market that will help you to start doing your research. One of the biggest assets, which we never used to have in the old days, is a website called side by side maps. And if you Google that, you'll find it easy enough. And basically, it's a split screen, and you'll have Google Earth on one one side. And then on the other side, you'll have a series of maps that you can load on, and there'll be the Ordnance Survey maps from Victorian times. So that helps you find Okay, let's see why that would help. Yeah, definitely. Yeah, it's been a massive help to me. Yeah, really big help, because you're looking for obvious things like disused pits and you know, old sand pits, gravel pits, where Victorians would have just basically filled a hole in the ground with a rubbish because there was no rubbish. There was no dustman. No collections of rubbish until probably about the 1920s.

Unknown:

Yeah, yeah. You know, throw it wherever I could. Often they go, Oh, it's been such a good guest.

Trev:

I'm determined, at some point to get poor sponsorship with a spied company like Draper sphere in higher quality. I don't know why unless you're going to give us some free spades. And then they're great. All Yeah, yeah. I feel that Paul is a Draper man. He said, You need to eat a good digging operation question. Well done. Yeah. Well, thanks. Well, yeah. Lots of tools. You need

Paul:

a good shovel. He's obviously imperative and, and the spade type, pointed, rounded edge shovelled are the best a bit like, you know, on a on a playing card, the spades on the playing card. One of those, you need a really good fork. And the best type of fork is what's called a balanced fork, or our coking fork, or obiora, or potato focus, the same sort of thing, which has about 10 things as opposed to four because I help you. It acts as a shovel that as much as a as a fork, so you can loosen the earth and then shovel it out with one tool while they're swapping from one to the other. But yeah, you do need to

Trev:

very quickly pulled two of your operators and stuff. Have you ever dug into the ground and smashed a ball? But you found Oh, no. Oh, no. It's

Wayne:

a cobalt blue. Yeah.

Paul:

Well, that'd be a signal, wouldn't it? Yeah, exactly. happens regularly. You can't help it. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I can imagine. Yeah. In fact, talking about cobalt blue code bottles. I noticed on eBay back in, in the summer, somewhere that actually sold a small section of a broken cobalt blue coloured bottle for about 500 pounds. Can you believe? Just a small bit? Well, a couple a couple of inches of it. Yeah. So it's

Trev:

up in your garden? Well, that's pre you just lob it back in wooden. Yeah. Yeah, check it out. Yeah, that's the kind of neighbourhood that's the kind of neighbour you are really.

Wayne:

Well, that's great, great information. Paul. What we're do is with the links that you've given us the side by side maps, and any UK but all collecting links, we'll put on the show notes to these to this episode. I think that's great. I think

Trev:

you've been it's To be honest, I was a bit like, really? When we were talking about having you on this, but I can I can see why people would want to do it. The history side of it,

Wayne:

is what you're gonna find treasure hunting isn't it's not treason, it's the fight. He's gonna get. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, great. A different way of looking at hobbies is I spend a day on the outside doors. The weather probably has a lot to do with it. But you know, you see that in the outside if you've got to make that you go with, you know, you've got the reference, you know what you're looking for. Okay, actually, it seems like a good day out. I get that guy myself. No mites. I was trying to I don't know how I know. He just puts it in again and he. But now that's great. We really appreciate your time today, Paul, and we'll put Linux Thank you very much. And we'll put some for some of you, if you don't mind. We'll put some of your photos on our social media and everything show, show people what you can find, basically.

Paul:

Absolutely. And in the meantime, I'll dig out some info of some of the books that if anyone is interested, perhaps you can, you'll be able to get onto onto that page. Top man.

Wayne:

Thanks for joining us today, Paul. Thanks, Paul. It's been great. Cheers. Well, thank you, Trevor. Thank you, Wayne. It's been a pleasure. Thanks very much. So Trev after that, are you going to get your hands down and dirty in the dump?

Trev:

I'm going to keep my fingers right in it. Right? Yeah. Good. You know, we're gonna find you know what? What I really like I don't know why because you conjured up kind of not the poisoned ones with the skull and crossbones. Yeah.

Wayne:

You didn't believe me? No, no, I didn't believe your evil pirate laugh because you fought pirates. Were you really sincere with that? I was like, yeah. And I was sure I've seen it. And Paul was like, yeah, Wayne's right. Yeah, that's cool. I've never felt so elated in my life again, this is because I've never had anything No one's ever given me any credit. Nothing. You know, he's Poor me Poor me laid with mud from the age of four. And done anything. All of a sudden, I've been elevated to a position in life. I'm glad it makes you feel like that. Yeah, cuz Yeah. Cuz you've got my best interests at heart driven. Yeah.

Trev:

Yeah. making you look making me look small, elevates you to a higher ground. I feel like I've got purpose. Anyway, going back to the poison bottles. Why do you like about that? Is I love that kind of old Victorian sort of steampunk thing. Yes. And this sort of laboratory where there was like, all these potions and concoctions and there's that one. Yeah, I think he probably reminds me of Young Frankenstein. Yeah. My Yeah. My Feldman's like, Guys head in there. It's like nearly dead. You know? Yeah, exactly. It makes you think of that Frankenstein. Poison on bald. Yeah, already? Honestly, yeah.

Wayne:

It's probably evokes memories is what I mean. That's when you're collecting things like antique things. It's all about memories, isn't it? Or bring it back to the past? I mean, it is. It's like when you go visit a stately home, there's always so you can take it I often think, oh, if I could go back 600 years, I wonder what it'd be like, you know, or something. Yeah.

Trev:

One of the one of the best things about one very quick, very quick, very quick story. While I went on holiday, once I went to this kind of monastery place, I think it was in Greece or somewhere. I don't know if there's a big Catholic thing. But we walk him around, and we were in one really sacred bit. And there was like, a bus full of like, kind of older women there who were obviously very religious because they were getting very emotional. And there was like an incense kind of hold a, you know, sort of pendulum thing, you know, walked about Yeah, waft about and add like a sort of drape over it. He was hanging down and it was cordoned off. But this woman got so emotional. And she had to touch it. And I was standing there. And she touched it. And she pulled it down on herself. It was the funniest thing. Honestly, I was crying. This woman was so emotional. She pulled this thing down, and it landed across her. So she was laying on the floor with an incense burner.

Wayne:

Just go in and you found some kind of Monty Python sketch in Greece in holiday.

Trev:

Standing there. I could have I should have elverta but it was funny. He wouldn't do that. Yeah. Oh, yeah, it was and that that epitomise is that thing? Yeah.

Wayne:

I know. I think what I take from it, you know, talking to people out there that might be thinking of taking up antique bottle collecting is that you're out gets you out and about in the fresh air. You can get again a bit like I'm guessing fishing, you can go and scout your mates and dig your dump, as you say, Yep. And, you know, spend a day in the sunshine basically, and hoping you find treasure that sense of purposes.

Trev:

As we said to poll earlier, the elation of finding what must be amazing. Yeah. scoring a goal in it. It is looking at Well, I've got it wipe it down what the muddy.

Wayne:

Genie comes out. It says like,

Trev:

yeah, Will Smith. Yeah, no only Scobie, Robin Williams. Robin Williams. Yeah, exactly. You know, I'm like, like the fridge pro fresh, Fresh Prince of Bel Air appear a lot of fresh produce.

Wayne:

Oh, sorry. If it if you think of that coming on here. We're Smith. We're still entertain you. Obviously. We like to call your belly one. Just one just last factor. But Exactly, exactly. You'd want more coming out your balls all day long. So we will put all the links up to all the associations for bottle collecting on the website as always mlo podcast.com give us some abuse on the blue button on there. As always we sit there we will. Yeah, like we did we'll, as we expect, Will Smith to be on there singing that wrap to The Fresh Prince of Bel Air. I haven't got a clue, Eric in a bit. I mean, your colour Bell ends. Yeah, exactly. And I'm sure you've got a bigger audience than us even so you know it. We'll get it out to more people. You want to do that. We'll bring it on. We're here for you. Right. So yeah, we'll put all the links up to all the bottle collecting associations in the in the UK. And enjoy and hope you enjoyed the show. And Thanks, Paul, for coming up. Did you dump this ticker dump? We'll see you on the next one. Shout out man.

intro:

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